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UFlex uses zero liquid discharge technology at India facility

The new technology saves 20 kilolitres of water daily.


Indian packaging company, UFlex, announced that its chemicals production unit in Noida, India is now a Zero Liquid Discharge (ZLD) facility. The move was driven by the aim to attain water sustainability and reduce its consumption and pollution.


ZLD is a strategic waste water management system that ensures that there is no discharge of industrial wastewater into the environment.


UFlex has proactively adopted this technology to significantly reduce their freshwater consumption by recognizing the importance of wastewater purification and recycling.

According to UFlex, the facility that has adopted ZLD technology has started saving close to 20 kilolitres of water per day.


UFlex’ Chemicals business develops eco-friendly, sustainable and food-safe compliant inks, adhesives, coatings and biodegradable packaging solutions such as primers, barrier, gloss and heat-seal coatings which has lower carbon footprint.


UFlex added that the implementation of ZLD technique the plant has ensured that no liquid waste is eliminated and its maximises water usage efficiency.


Explaining how the ZLD technology worked: “The zero liquid discharge Chemical plant uses a 100% supply of effluent treated water of sewage treatment plant (STP) as well as effluent treatment plant (ETP). It is subsequently treated through the combination of technologies like Membrane Bio-Reactor (MBR), Reverse osmosis (RO), and Agitated Thin Film Dryer (AFTD).


The permeate good quality water which is the final product derived is thus re-used in boiler feed, cooling tower makeup water, and fume hoods; without being discharged into the municipal sewer thereby putting the discarded water back to use. The rejected water is converted in to solid waste residue via evaporation process which is in turn discarded as hazardous waste (as per the regulatory norms).”

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